600 homes green-lit for TfL and Notting Hill Genesis partnership in Greenwich

600 homes green-lit for TfL and Notting Hill Genesis partnership in Greenwich

Transport for London (TfL) and Notting Hill Genesis have been given the go-ahead to deliver 619 new homes as part of their Kidbrooke Partnership LLP joint venture.

The development will be built on a vacant four-acre site in the Royal Borough of Greenwich. The scheme will comprise of eight buildings with the new homes a mixture of one, two and three-bedroom properties. Half of the new homes will be affordable through a mixture of shared ownership and London Affordable Rent.

The green-light on the project follows the decision by the Deputy Mayor, Jules Pipe, to call in the application and act as the local planning authority.

As well as new homes, the proposals for the site include new amenities for the community, such as an improved transport hub and a new village square.

The area, which is described as an under-utilised brownfield site, benefits from its proximity to the Zone 3 Kidbrooke national rail station and the bus stops on Kidbrooke Park Road. It was previously part of an RAF base and was then used as operational land during the construction of the A2. It has since been largely unoccupied, apart from Henley Cross bus stop.

Graeme Craig, director of commercial development at TfL, said: “Kidbrooke offers us a great opportunity to deliver homes the capital desperately needs and we are delighted to have been given the green light to take our proposals forward with Notting Hill Genesis.

“As well as providing hundreds of new homes, of which half will be affordable, our plans will deliver new and improved amenities for the community and support the economy of the area by providing fantastic new retail and commercial space and job opportunities. The development will also generate vital revenue to reinvest into the transport network.”

John Hughes, group director of development at Notting Hill Genesis, said: “Our vision is to create a high-quality, mixed-use development which completes the new local centre at Kidbrooke and contributes positively to the regeneration of the area for the benefit of the whole community.

“Alongside the creation of thoughtfully designed buildings, extensive public realm, business space and new amenities, we look forward to delivering 619 much needed new homes, half of which will be either London Affordable Rent or shared ownership, to meet London and Greenwich’s significant housing need.”

The Kidbrooke site forms part of TfL’s wider housing programme, which has a target to start on TfL sites with capacity for 10,000 homes by March 2021 as well as a commitment to deliver 50 per cent affordable housing across all sites brought to the market since May 2016.

Notting Hill Genesisis one of the largest housing associations in the country, with around 64,000 homes across London and the south-east, serving more than 170,000 residents.

Thamesmead Waterfront: Peabody and Lendlease partner to deliver thousands of new homes

Thamesmead Waterfront: Peabody and Lendlease partner to deliver thousands of new homes

G15 housing association Peabody and property group Lendlease have formed a 50:50 joint venture for the c.£8bn development at Thamesmead Waterfront in south-east London.

The two organisations will work together on the planning and delivery of the scheme, which will deliver a minimum of 11,500 homes. The project will contribute to the continuing economic regeneration of east London and the Thames Estuary and aims to revitalise the existing Thamesmead town centre along with creating many new homes.

Currently much of the site is undeveloped and underpopulated. It includes 2.5km of river frontage, as well as an abundance of green space and two lakes.

Key to the project is the plan for a new cross-river extension of the Docklands Light Railway to Thamesmead. Improving transport links in the area is said to be critical in unlocking the full ambition of the scheme and to enable the 250-acre development to achieve its full potential.

Peabody CEO Brendan Sarsfield said: “Thamesmead Waterfront represents a historic opportunity to transform an isolated and under-utilised riverside location in London.

“A new DLR crossing from east London would allow this long-term partnership to create a new waterfront district with thousands of new affordable homes and a new leisure, cultural and commercial offer for the town, for London, and for the wider Thames Estuary.

“This would unlock huge benefits for existing and new communities, boosting the economy and providing huge opportunities for London and the UK.”

Neil Martin, chief executive at Lendlease, Europe, added: “Improving transport links is a vital part of the long-term regeneration of the area, as it will bring those new homes within reach of the heart of London and help us deliver one of the most exciting new places to live in the capital.”

This is the single largest development in Peabody’s 150-year history. The Waterfront joint venture is part of Peabody’s long-term regeneration of Thamesmead, a town in south-east London which is the same size as central London. The area measures around 760 hectares, with Peabody owning around 65% of the land.

Eco-friendly Norwich council estate named UK’s best new building

Eco-friendly Norwich council estate named UK’s best new building

Goldsmith Street in Norwich has been named as the winner of the 2019 RIBA Stirling Prize. The honour is awarded annually by The Royal Institute of British Architects (RIBA) to the UK’s best new building.

The architecture award, first established in 1996, is presented to the architect of the building thought to be the most significant of the year for the evolution of architecture and the built environment.

Goldsmith Street, designed by Mikhail Riches with Cathy Hawley, is comprised of almost 100 ultra low-energy homes for Norwich City Council.

In contrast to the higher-rise flats in the surrounding area, Goldsmith Street is arranged in seven terrace blocks, with rows of two-storey houses bookended by three-storey flats, each with their own front door.

The outside space sees the back gardens of the central terraces share a secure alleyway for children to play together as well as a wide landscaped walkway for communal gatherings, which runs through the middle of the estate. Parking has been pushed to the outer edges of the development.

The project meets ‘Passivhaus’ environmental standards and is a passive solar scheme, designed to minimise fuel bills for residents.

Measures to maximise solar gain include: all homes face south, every wall is over 600mm thick, and the roofs are angled at 15 degrees to ensure each terrace does not block sunlight from homes in the street behind.

The 2019 RIBA Stirling Prize judges, chaired by Julia Barfield, said: “Goldsmith Street is a modest masterpiece. It is high-quality architecture in its purest, most environmentally and socially-conscious form.

“Behind restrained creamy façades are impeccably-detailed, highly sustainable homes – an incredible achievement for a development of this scale. This is proper social housing, over ten years in the making, delivered by an ambitious and thoughtful council. These desirable, spacious, low-energy properties should be the norm for all council housing.

RIBA president Alan Jones said: “Faced with a global climate emergency, the worst housing crisis for generations and crippling local authority cuts, Goldsmith Street is a beacon of hope. It is commended not just as a transformative social housing scheme and eco-development, but a pioneering exemplar for other local authorities to follow.”

David Mikhail of Mikhail Riches, said: “Goldsmith Street’s success is testimony to the vision and leadership of Norwich City Council. We thank them for their commitment and support. They believe that council housing tenants deserve great design.

“It is not often we are appointed to work on a project so closely aligned with what we believe matters; buildings people love which are low impact. We hope other local authorities will be inspired to deliver beautiful homes for people who need them the most, and at an affordable price.”

Goldsmith Street beat shortlisted projects Cork House in Berkshire, London Bridge Station, Nevill Holt Opera in Leicestershire, the Macallan Distillery and Visitor Experience, Moray and the Weston at Yorkshire Sculpture Park.

Empty homes in England increase by 5%

Empty homes in England increase by 5%

New research from Action on Empty Homes reveals the fastest rise in the number of long-term empty homes in England since the recession.

An additional 10,983 homes were left empty in 2018 – an increase of 5.3 per cent, which is more than double the 2.6 per cent rise seen in the previous year. The new figures mark the second consecutive year with a substantial increase in the amount of long-term empty homes, reversing the previous trend of steady declines seen since 2008.

Across England there are now more than 216,000 long-term empty homes, equivalent to 72 per cent of the government’s annual new homes target.

The report shows empty homes occur in all Council Tax bands but are particularly prevalent in the highest band (Band H) and in the lowest band (Band A). It also reveals the increase in long-term empty homes is not limited to one area of England.

Two thirds of the country’s 326 local authorities are experiencing a year-on-year uplift. More than a third of local authorities are seeing uplifts greater than 10 per cent; while more than one in ten is witnessing an increase of 30 per cent or more. Five local authorities including Portsmouth, Southwark and Hartlepool have all seen surges of more than 50 per cent.

The analysis says the increase in empty homes is being driven by the end of the Coalition Government’s Empty Homes Programme, which finished in 2015. It had used several targeted funds to invest £216 million in bringing over 9,000 long-term empty homes back into use. The recent slowdown in the housing market is also a factor.

The report makes recommendations for tackling the issue, including a national investment programme targeted at areas with high levels of long-term empty homes; re-establishing dedicated funding programmes to support local authorities and housing providers to create affordable housing from long-term empty homes in all parts of England; and supporting community-based regeneration approaches.

Reducing the number of empty homes also has huge cross-party parliamentary support. A ComRes poll of MPs commissioned by Action on Empty Homes shows that 72 per cent of MPs polled rank action on empty homes as one of their top two priorities for combating the current housing crisis. More than 80 per cent supported targeted funding for local authorities, charities and local organisations to buy, lease or refurbish empty homes.

Will McMahon, director of Action on Empty Homes, said: “With homeless numbers at their highest levels in over a decade, it makes no sense to leave hundreds of thousands of homes standing long-term empty. Like the housing crisis, empty homes are a national problem, two-thirds of councils have rising numbers. National problems need national solutions.

“The Government must provide a solution for every street in Britain. Significant investment is needed to turn around communities that have faced under-investment for decades, and all local councils need new powers to take action. England’s 216,000 empty homes are everyone’s problem and everyone’s opportunity. The time for action is now.”

£2million cash boost to councils to help protect nation’s Green Belt

£2million cash boost to councils to help protect nation’s Green Belt

Local authorities will be able to access a pot of nearly two million pounds to preserve the country’s Green Belt for the future.

The money is being put aside to clampdown on illegal developments, including on the Green Belt. 37 local authorities will be able to use a slice of the fund to hire enforcement officers, use new technology and help meet the legal costs of tackling rogue developers and developments.

Councils will be receiving the cash from the Planning Delivery Fund – a one-off cash boost to assist with the costs of protecting locations with significant areas of Green Belt land.

The move is part of Housing Minister Rt Hon Esther McVey MP’s drive to protect the Green Belt for generations to come. Speaking at the annual RESI Convention in Newport, McVey announced that 37 councils would be receiving a total of up to £50,000 each to help with the crackdown.

McVey said: “Once the Green Belt is built on it’s often gone for good that’s why we are determined to protect it. The public have told us loud and clear they want it kept for future generations to enjoy.

“The funding announced today will help councils clamp down on rogue developers, giving the areas with the highest levels of Green Belt the funds needed to punish those who build illegally.”

The National Planning Policy Framework issued by the Ministry of Housing, Communities & Local Government states that ‘The government attaches great importance to Green Belts. The fundamental aim of Green Belt policy is to prevent urban sprawl by keeping land permanently open; the essential characteristics of Green Belts are their openness and their permanence.’

It continues, ‘Green Belt serves five purposes:-

(a) to check the unrestricted sprawl of large built-up areas;

(b) to prevent neighbouring towns merging into one another;

(c) to assist in safeguarding the countryside from encroachment;

(d) to preserve the setting and special character of historic towns; and

(e) to assist in urban regeneration, by encouraging the recycling of derelict and other urban land.’

More protection

 

Reforms to the national planning rulebook last year maintained the strong protections on the Green Belt, which protect an area’s character and prevent urban sprawl. Only in exceptional circumstances can land in the Green Belt be built on.

Alongside the cash boost for councils, the Ministry of Housing, Communities and Local Government is teaming up with the Royal Town Planning Institute to overhaul the national enforcement handbook.

The updated handbook will provide the latest best practice and expertise on shutting down illegal building and preventing it from happening, whilst ensuring developers obtain full planning permission before any building work commences.

Click for a list of councils who applied and were successful in receiving the funding.